Oracy

Oracy - the ability to express oneself fluently and grammatically in speech, the development and application of a set of skills associated with effective spoken communication, teaching children to learn to talk confidently, appropriately and sensitively.

In short, Oracy is the ability to communicate effectively using spoken language. At Ashford Oaks we value its importance from Nursery all the way up to Year 6 and beyond primary school which is why it is at the core of our curriculum.

Oracy - the ability to express oneself fluently and grammatically in speech, the development and application of a set of skills associated with effective spoken communication, teaching children to learn to talk confidently, appropriately and sensitively.

In short, Oracy is the ability to communicate effectively using spoken language. At Ashford Oaks we value its importance from Nursery all the way up to Year 6 and beyond primary school which is why it is at the core of our curriculum.

We divide Oracy into 4 strands: Physical, Linguistic, Cognitive, Social & Emotional.

  1. Physical - make yourself heard with your body and your voice, think of your voice as an instrument – with plenty of practice it can be altered.

  2. Linguistic – knowing the right words or phrases to use, choosing subject specific vocabulary.

  3. Cognitive – organise and structure your thoughts, deliberately thinking, forming relevant ideas and developing reasoning.

  4. Social & Emotional – engaging with people around you, interacting with confidence, sharing ideas but giving others time to share theirs.

 

Why is Oracy important for children?

  • Cognitive gains – Oracy has an important effect on a child’s level of educational attainment. It can help improve results, support the retention of subject specific knowledge and help with the transference of reasoning skills.

  • Personal and social gains – Oracy can improve a child’s attitude towards learning, enhance self-esteem and self-confidence and reduce anxiety in social situations.

  • Communication skills – in a growing age of technology, children need to be able to communicate clearly and effectively with many mediums. It is also important to think about our children’s futures and prepare them for the wider world – we need to equip them with skills that could provide them with job opportunities. Being able to communicate effectively is one of the most important skills employers look for in potential candidates so they can work in harmony with co – workers and work effectively in different circumstances.

 

What does Oracy look like?

In order to have successful conversations, every class has created a set of clear ground rules that they have agreed to follow. 

To help children scaffold their interactions and responses, we use sentence stems in all lessons. These are shared with the children and modelled to encourage them to use them when they take part in group discussions. 

Oracy can be seen and heard in all lessons in a variety of ways. We have various Oracy groups that children experience depending on the context of the discussion being had – it could be with a partner or a group of 8 or as a whole class.

If your child comes home from school stating that they got into an onion, don’t worry they haven’t gone mad, it is actually the name of an Oracy group!

The opportunities for discussions are endless:

  • Reading – predicting what’s going to happen in a story or to a particular character

  • Writing – identifying key words and discussing the effect they have in a text

  • Maths – proving whether a question is true or false and justifying why

  • Science – explaining the results of an experiment scientifically

  • Art – sharing opinions about a piece of art and whether you like it or not

  • History – discussing whether a source is reliable or not

  • Geography – debating whether more houses should be built or not

  • PE – giving feedback on a team’s performance

 

It’s not all about talking, it’s about listening as well. We teach the children that this is also a vital skill to have and promote active listening. This includes responding appropriately and being able to build on someone’s answer by either agreeing or disagreeing but making a point that is related to the one that they just heard.

 

How can I support my child with Oracy?

  • Daily reading – have discussions about the book they are reading. Are there any words that they didn’t understand? Could they make a predictions about what they think is going to happen?

  • Have discussions about their day – what did they learn about? What did they enjoy/not enjoy? Why?

  • Encourage them to ask questions then listen carefully to the answer.

  • Encourage them to speak in full sentences and correct any mistakes they make – we often hear strange requests such as ‘Can I have a toilet?’ instead of ‘Can I go to the toilet?’ Choosing your words carefully is very important!

Oak Tree Road  Ashford  Kent  TN23 4QR  📞01233 631259

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